Auwahi Volunteer Trip December 12th, 2014

Best Group shotAloha no,

Every time we get together on the mountain at Auwahi with good people doing meaningful work is truly a blessing. Some trips though, often for seemingly the most subtle of reasons, are extra special. Our most recent volunteer trip was one of those days.

We want to thank all those who contributed to the success of that weeding and out planting trip. Foremost of these, of course, are the incredible core of Maui volunteers, Alex, Ann, Art, Ben, Bob, Dan, Erica, Greg, Kailie, Keahi, Kiana, Mia, Mike, Robert, Scott, Stuart, Tim, William and Zane. Mahalo loa to you all. A successful planting is like a well-timed relay race and requires the expertise of our special Maui native plant cultivators, specifically, Jonathan and Ethan at Native Nursery, Anna and Don at Ho’olawa Farms, and in the case of our last trip, a very special gift from Martha Vockrodt and Fleming Arboretum of kauila (Alphitonia ponderosa auwahiensis) seedlings which in batches are being returned to their native homes.

 

View from rocky ridge to coastThe magic of forest restoration continues on Friday, December 12th, as we head back to Auwahi forest to do more hana pono probably some weeding, planting and seed collecting. Just so you know we receive about twice as many requests to participate as we have room to accommodate in our four wheel drive vehicles. Toward the aim of filling every seat on every trip, once you are confirmed to come on a trip, if you need to cancel please let us know as soon as possible so we can fill your seat.

Christmas time in the mountains is often cold and wet but when it is clear, it can be startlingly beautiful. So if you are in good shape and want to help out, please grab a jacket and hat and let us know if you can join us. Please reserve your seat by contacting auwahi@yahoo.com.

 

Where: ʻUlupalakua Ranch Store

When: Friday, December 12th, 2014 8:00 AM – 4:00 PM

Due to the rough and steep terrain, WE REQUIRE HIKING BOOTS TO BE WORN THAT COVER THE ANKLE, and unfortunately, we will have to turn folks away without proper boots. We have some extra boots you can borrow but please bring your own socks. Plan to pack layered clothing, rain gear, two liters of water, lunch, sunscreen and a hat. Please clean all your gear, backpacks and boots to leave hitchhiking seeds behind.

Mahalo loa,

Maui Restoration Group

Lunch (3)

Auwahi Volunteer Trip 09.20.2014

8-30-14 lunch shot EIVOur next tree planting trip at Auwahi dry forest will be Saturday, September 20, 2014. As always, thanks to the enthusiastic support of the Maui community, our trips are traditionally full so if you would like to come along, please reserve a space as soon as you can. We’d love to see you.

On that Saturday, we will be heading up from our meeting place at ʻUlupalakua Ranch into the mountains to plant native tree and shrub seedlings this time in the southeast corner of the third Auwahi exclosure. At this site, the forest restoration sequence we have developed is a year along now. Ecologically, the area is basically a living laboratory, as native plants ‘reassemble’ themselves in the recovering forest. Fascinating.

20140830_lichen and fog Ann Camit

Last month, while much of the rest of Maui was baking in heat, a group of 24 us spent the day planting trees just to the east of next Saturday’s site. The morning skies were clear but by 10 AM we were enveloped in dense mist that became thicker and thicker until it had turned into heavy straight-down rain with no wind. Perfect planting weather. At day’s end, there was a lot of wet gear, big smiles, and questions when the next trip would be.

Days like these are just another reminder of why we all continue to work so hard to further forest restoration at Auwahi. Being in special natural places, working with special people to restore the land can not only accomplish important work but also can create powerful and lasting memories.

20140830_rain and people Ann CamitWhere: ʻUlupalakua Ranch Store

When: Saturday, September 20th, 2014, 8:00 AM – 4:00 PM

If you would like to join us, please reserve your seat by contacting
auwahi@yahoo.com.

Due to the rough and steep terrain, WE REQUIRE HIKING BOOTS TO BE WORN THAT COVER THE ANKLE, and unfortunately, we will have to turn folks away without proper boots. We have some extra boots you can borrow but please bring your own socks. Plan to pack layered clothing, rain gear, two liters of water, lunch, sunscreen and a hat. Please clean all your gear, backpacks and boots to leave hitchhiking seeds behind.

Mahalo loa,

Maui Restoration Group

Auwahi Volunteer Trip 08.30.2014

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Auwahi Volunteer Trip 07.19.2014

auwahi service trip

Auwahi I

A grove of rare native trees is born.

Last month, we headed up on the mountain to plant what many of us considered a treasure, a new batch of olopua fresh from Native Nursery. The olopua seedlings planted by volunteers here at Auwahi over the last few months will likely grow together in the rich, black, rocky loam to become a grove of tall tangled trees over the next century. Good work Maui.

 

 

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An Olopua seedling finds a new home

Olopua (Nestegis sandwicensis) are uncommon to rare trees of mid-elevation leeward forests found only in the Hawaiian Islands. Though primarily known as olopua, the names ulupua and pua have also been recorded.  To early Hawaiians, olopua was most valued for its dense wood and its use as durable handles for one of the most basic and critical tools of the Hawaiian life style, the ko’i (adze).

Used in much the same way as prized kauila wood, the light brown to almost cocoa brown olopua wood was fastened to sharpened stone wedges with ‘aha (cordage usually of olonā or coconut sennit). The stone blades were constructed from high-quality dense blanks, these prized and transported long distances from remote and renowned quarry sites such as those on the high mountains of Mauna Kea and Haleakalā. Made in a variety of sizes and finishing types, ko’i were used by the people of old to fashion everything from 40-50 foot wa’a (canoe) from trees to the mirror smooth ‘umeke lā’au (wooden food bowl).

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Olopua flowers

Our next batch of keiki olopua are ready to be returned to their native lands and we will be heading up to Auwahi again on July 19th to do more good work. Please consider joining us.

Where: ‘Ulupalakua Ranch Store

When: Saturday, July 19th, 2014, 8:00 AM – 4:00 PM

If you would like to join us, please reserve your seat by contacting auwahi@yahoo.com.   Due to the rough and steep terrain, WE REQUIRE HIKING BOOTS TO BE WORN THAT COVER THE ANKLE, and unfortunately, we will have to turn folks away without proper boots. We have some extra boots you can borrow but please bring your own socks. Plan to pack layered clothing, rain gear, two liters of water, lunch, sunscreen and a hat. Please clean all your gear, backpacks and boots to leave hitchhiking seeds behind.

Mahalo nō for your dedicated support and hard work.

Maui Restoration GroupMRG_logo_holei