Kohala

A-planting we will go!
 

Let’s Plant a Forest!

We grow ’em; we plant ’em!

KWP has been growing native trees and shrubs of Kohala from seeds that we collect during work days across the mountain since 2009. We just did the math, and an amazing 600 people have planted trees on Kohala, and the total number of trees from volunteers alone is 27,000 trees! That added to the more than 50,000 trees planted by the KWP partners and crew comes to a whopping total of 77,000 trees. WOWEE!

Many of you reading this email had a hand in this inspiring total, and I hope you feel just a little tingle of pride and hope for what we have accomplished together.

So, let’s keep up the good work, and plant some MORE!  Join us this Saturday to keep up the momentum.  We will be heading mauka to the Luahine side of the Koai‘a Corridor, planting four different species (for those of you who need to know. . . it’s koai’a, ‘a’ali’i, māmane & manono). We will work in teams, so there will be a job for everyone, no matter your age or experience!

Let’s meet at The Kohala Center office at 8:30 am, then “vanpool” to the work site. Wear boots or sturdy shoes, and bring along sack lunch, water bottle, and a jacket in case it gets stormy. We provide tools, gloves, plants and snacks. We will finish and be back to town by 3:30 pm.

Please click the button to RSVP by Thursday, 10/9/14. Space is limited, so please reply soon.

E Komo Mai!
Have you seen me?

I’m a furry black caterpillar that was recently released from captivity to help control some nasty weeds in our forests and pastures. My name is Secusio extensa, but my friends call me “fireweed moth” because of my particular food choices. I’m from east Africa, and I was brought to Hawaii more than a decade ago to be tested as a potential biological control for fireweed.

As it turns out, I was a very fussy eater, which is exactly what the scientists were looking for.  I will only eat fireweed and cape ivy, and would rather starve to death than touch any native or beneficial plants. I hope that you will welcome me with fond aloha, and I hope I can help out Melora and her friends by doing what nature designed me to do: eat  invasive plants!

Mahalo to Gunner for the photo!

Count me in!

Kohala

KWP Summer Shindig

A Party for ALL of our Peeps!
Saturday Aug. 9th, 8:30-4:30

Let’s celebrate all that we have accomplished this year with your help!

Some of the past year’s highlights:
• Community volunteers donated more than 2,000 hours of service
• We planted thousands of native trees to bring back the forest
• 180 kids from 7 local schools took science field trips to native forest
• We controlled hundreds of acres of invasive weeds
• 29 families participated in Waimea Nature Camp this summer
• Researchers from UH-Hilo collected data to learn more about Kohala Mountain

Summer Shindig: Plan for the Day
8:30-12:30   Native tree planting on Kohala Mountain – everyone is invited!
12:30-3:30   Barbeque, family games, obstacle courses
3:30- 4:30    Presentations by Teen Leaders; volunteer service awards

Registration and participation are FREE. The KWP crew will be grilling up yummy stuffs to eat, and we will provide drinks and snacks, too. If you can, please bring something to throw on the grill or a dish to share!

Just click the button below to go the online registration site. You can register for the morning/ afternoon events, or both.
Easy as 1-2-3 . . . . clicks to RSVP . . . for you and your family!
If the button doesn’t work for some reason, copy and paste this into your browser: http://www.eventbrite.com/e/kwp-summer-shindig-registration-12259798387

Questions?  Contact Melora at Coordinator@kohalawatershed.org

Count me in! Click to register.

Kohala

Summer is Here!

Volunteer Days in July and the Summer Shindig in August

The mountain is inviting you this summer – it’s a great time to set aside a Saturday, invite the ‘ohana, neighbors, and friends.  And save the date for our Summer Shindig on August 9th!

Koai’a Corridor

Saturday, July 12, 2014
8:30 am – 3:30 pm

After many successful planting days in the lower part of the Koai’a Corridor, we are now ready with some wet forest plants to revisit the upper corridor, seen in the photo. We will be outplanting manono, pilo and a’ali’i that we have been growing in the nursery, but also experimenting with direct-seeding of common tree seeds as well.

It’s exciting to walk around and see all the native plants that are naturally regenerating here — and to see our keikis that we planted over the past 6 years finally pushing through the grass and taking in the sun. After planting in the morning, we will do a short hike into the native rain forest up mauka.

RSVP for 7/12/14

Kilohana Stream

Saturday, July 26, 2014
8:30 am – 3:30 pm

Some of the KWP’s veteran volunteers mentioned this amazing place to Melora the other day, asking if we were going to go back.  So — thanks for the reminder — and yes, we are!

This Biodiversity Preserve was the focus of many early volunteer days, and fortunately, all that work has paid off.  We’re pretty sure that VERY few weeds are left inside this 10-acre fenced preserve, but we will do a full sweep of the area, and make sure we liberate any native plants that are being threatened. If you are wanting to see Kohala’s native forest in its most pristine state, join us — and don’t forget your camera!

RSVP for 7/26/14

Save the Date . . . then join us Saturday, August 9th for the KWP Summer Shindig*!

You know how much fun it is to work with the KWP crew,
now it’s time to see how much fun we can have when we PLAY!

What’s in store? An optional short morning of work on the mountain, then an afternoon of fun:
•The Obstacle Course (can you do the mud challenge?),
• Barbecue (no Costco snacks today!),
•”Field Crew Games” (you’ve maybe seen the Lumberjack Games. . .?)
• Presentations by our own Teen Leaders (the inside story on camp, crew, and research)
•Volunteer Service Awards for 50, 100, 200, & 300 hours of service.

* A shindig is a “large, lively party, especially one celebrating something.”

Koolau

Koʻolau Mountains Watershed Partnership’s next volunteer work trip will be at Manana on Saturday, July 19th. All who are comfortable with a 4-mile round-trip hike, plus work time, are welcome. The hike to the work site is moderate and takes about 1 to 1.5 hours.

 

Where and when to meet: We will be meeting at the end of Komo Mai Drive, in front of the locked gate restricting vehicular traffic, at 8:45 am on Saturday, July 19th. When you turn onto Komo Mai Drive, drive through Pacific Palisades to the end of the road. There is street parking near the cul-de-sac.

 

What to bring: Pack plenty of water (~2 liters), lunch, snacks, sunscreen, hat, rain gear and sunglasses. We will provide all the necessary tools (handsaws and gloves). Proper foot wear (closed toed shoes) is required. Spiked boots or tabis are recommended.

 

Plan for the day: In the parking area at 8:45 am, we will pass out gear and give a short introduction/safety briefing. Starting the hike around 9:00 am, we anticipate making it to the work area around 10:30 am. We will then go over the work/data collection plan and start removing (everyone will be using small folding handsaws; KMWP staff will also be using herbicide) paperbark (Melaleuca quinquenervia), manuka (Leptospermum scoparium), strawberry guava (Psidium cattleianum), and Passiflora laurifolia. We will break for lunch around 12:30 pm, work just a bit more after that, and then head back down, aiming to reach the parking area before 3:00 pm.

 

Please RSVP to Koolau Mountains Watershed Partnership <koolaupartnership@gmail.com>We will be limiting the number of people to 10 so the first ones to RSVP will have priority. Hope you can make it!

Waianae

Upcoming Volunteer Days!

Make a difference in your watershed by volunteering with the Wai’anae Mountains Watershed Partnership!

For more information and to sign up for any of the events below please
email:  mikaelambolling@gmail.com
Thursday, July 3rd, 2014
8:30am – 3pm
Wai’anae Kai Forest Reserve

WMWP is hosting a volunteer day at the Vegetative Fire Break in the Wai’anae Kai Forest Reserve. The day will consist of cutting down and hauling invasive haole koa trees with two Hawai’i Youth Conservation Corps teams. Volunteers can come for the whole day or just for a few hours!
Friday, July 25th, 2014
8:30am – 2:00pm
Ahua Reef – Joint Base Pearl Harbor Hickam

Come help pull out invasive pickleweed at WMWP’s only coastal project area. Anyone is welcome to come as long as they provide their information before-hand to get on base. This is a great volunteer trip for all ages! Come for a few hours or the whole day!
Sunday, July 27th, 2014
8:30am – 1:30pm
Wai’anae Kai Forest Reserve

Cut down invasive haole koa trees in WMWP’s Vegetative Fire Break with the American Water Works Association and the Hawai’i Water Environment Association.

Kohala

Help us control invasive HImalayan ginger in the Kohala cloud forest!
 

What is a cloud forest?The upland forests of Kohala Mountain are usually clothed in clouds. When the tiny droplets of water that make up the clouds collide with trees, the leaves become saturated with water, and the water drips to the ground. This “fog drip” is a significant source of water for our forests, especially during drought times like we have been experiencing lately.

You will know you are in a cloud forest when you notice that the trunks of trees are covered in dense layers of epiphytes — the plants that grow on other plants — like mosses, ferns, herbs, and even other trees!

These forests are globally rare and contain many endangered species of plants, insects, and snails.

Yes! I want to be a Ginger Ninja!

Ginger & Cloud Forest

Join us in our ninja battle against this invader!

Saturday, June 28, 2014   8:30 am – 3:30 pm

We are making a difference to the forest of Pu’u Pili, but it’s a steep uphill battle against the menace of non-native Himalayan ginger (Hedychium gardnerianum).

For the past century or so, Himalayan ginger has spread unhindered from a few exotic gardens, slowly but surely, into the native forest. It now dominates many thousands of acres of watershed forest, and like most invasive plants in Hawai’i, its spread is uncontrolled by pests, predation, or disease.

So what is KWP doing about it?  We have designated special areas on the mountain where our partners think it is possible to beat back the invasion and let the native forest dominate and thrive.  Pu’u Pili at Kahua Ranch is one of those places, and we’ve cleared nearly 30 acres so far.

On this volunteer day, you will be instructed in The Ninja Way, following the Three Deadly Steps: Slice, Stack, Spray. Please bring along rain gear (essential!), warm clothes, boots or sturdy shoes that can get muddy, long pants and long-sleeved shirt (needed for safety during our work). Pack your lunch and water bottle in a backpack, and get ready for a day in the inspiring wet wilderness of Kohala Mountain.

Meet at The Kohala Center office (65-1291A Kawaihae Rd) in Waimea at 8:30, and we will carpool in the KWP 4×4 vehicles. We will return to Waimea by 3:30. Because this trip has limited seats, please RSVP only if you are prepared to join us rain or shine!

 

KMWP, May 24

 

Koʻolau Mountains Watershed Partnership’s next volunteer work trip will be at Manana on Saturday, May 24. All who are comfortable with a 4-mile round-trip hike, plus work time, are welcome. The hike to the work site is moderate and takes about 1 to 1.5 hours.

Where and when to meet: We will be meeting at the end of Komo Mai Drive, in front of the locked gate restricting vehicular traffic, at 8:45 am on Saturday, May 24. When you turn onto Komo Mai Drive, drive through Pacific Palisades to the end of the road. There is street parking near the cul-de-sac.

What to bring: Pack plenty of water (~2 liters), lunch, snacks, sunscreen, hat, rain gear and sunglasses. We will provide all the necessary tools (handsaws and gloves). Proper foot wear (closed toed shoes) is required. Spiked boots or tabis are recommended.

Plan for the day: In the parking area at 8:45 am, we will pass out gear and give a short introduction/safety briefing. Starting the hike around 9:00 am, we anticipate making it to the work area around 10:30 am. We will then go over the work/data collection plan and start removing (everyone will be using small folding handsaws; KMWP staff will also be using herbicide) paperbark (Melaleuca quinquenervia), manuka (Leptospermum scoparium), strawberry guava (Psidium cattleianum), and Passiflora laurifolia. We will break for lunch around 12:30 pm, work just a bit more after that, and then head back down, aiming to reach the parking area before 3:00 pm.

Please RSVP. We will be limiting the number of people to 20 so the first ones to RSVP will have priority. Hope you can make it! Email Koolau Mountains Watershed Partnership, koolaupartnership@gmail.com to RSVP. 

Kohala – May 17

By the end of 2014, we will have a 3/4-mile nature trail at the Koai’a Tree Sanctuary, thanks to a Natural Resources Program grant from the Hawaii Tourism Authority through the Hawaii Community Foundation. A botanical illustrator and a graphic designer working on a trail map and brochure, and we will be putting signs along the trail as well.  Stay tuned!

Mālama Koaiʻa Day

Volunteer Work Day in the Koaiʻa Sanctuary

Saturday, May 17, 2014 8:30 am – 2:30pm

150 years ago, instead of unending grassy pastures, a mesic (moist) forest blanketed the middle-elevation leeward slopes of Kohala Mountain. This unique koaiʻa-mamane-naio-ʻiliahi forest once covered more than 40,000 acres, and was home to one of the most biologically diverse ecosystems in Hawaiʻi. What do we have left of this massive forest? A few scattered native trees, and a little 13-acre plot of forest. Yup, that is it. The direct result of the impacts of humans and their domestic animals.

Since about 1960, that 13 acres has been fenced and protected as the Koaiʻa Tree Sanctuary, under the care of the State DLNR Division of Forestry and Wildlife. Itʻs all that we have left, and we are doing our best to care for it, to mālama both the ancient trees and the new growth.

Join us this Saturday for a diverse day of work, suitable for any age and ability, including kids!  We will be building steps on the trail, clearing a new slope of fountain grass, and planting a couple hundred native shrubs. Wear sturdy shoes, and bring protection from both sun and rain. We will provide tools, gloves, and snacks. You bring lunch and a water bottle.

Interested in joining us? Click here to RSVP by Friday, 5/16/14.

Maui- Waikamoi Hike 5/17

waikamoi 5.17.2014

Kohala Watershed Partnership

The native trees and shrubs planted by volunteers over the past 5 years in the Koai’a Corridor restoration area are busting through the grass and really becoming a forest!

Celebrating Earth Day 2014

Help us reach our goal of 1000 native trees planted in April!

Join us for two volunteer work days next week, when we will carrying on the KWP tradition of planting native trees to celebrate Earth Day. We are offering a half day of planting in the morning on the actual Earth Day, Tuesday, April 22nd, and a full day of planting on Saturday, April 26th. Join us for one or both days!

For either day, be sure to wear sturdy footwear, and bring along a water bottle and dress for any weather (rain gear, jacket, and sunscreen). We will provide tools, gloves, snacks, drinking water, and of course, PLANTS!

The ultimate question is. . . will you be in the picture this year?

Tuesday, April 22
8:30 am – 12:30 pm
Click to RSVP for 4/22
Are your Saturdays just too busy to fit in a volunteer day? Yes? Then join us for a morning of planting on Earth Day.
Saturday, April 26
8:30 am – 3:30 pm
Click to RSVP for 4/26
Join other members of the community and the KWP crew to plant trees at the Koai’a Corridor. Don’t forget your lunch!