Current Watershed Volunteer Opportunities

Koolau

Koʻolau Mountains Watershed Partnership’s next volunteer work trip will be at Manana on Saturday, July 19th. All who are comfortable with a 4-mile round-trip hike, plus work time, are welcome. The hike to the work site is moderate and takes about 1 to 1.5 hours.

 

Where and when to meet: We will be meeting at the end of Komo Mai Drive, in front of the locked gate restricting vehicular traffic, at 8:45 am on Saturday, July 19th. When you turn onto Komo Mai Drive, drive through Pacific Palisades to the end of the road. There is street parking near the cul-de-sac.

 

What to bring: Pack plenty of water (~2 liters), lunch, snacks, sunscreen, hat, rain gear and sunglasses. We will provide all the necessary tools (handsaws and gloves). Proper foot wear (closed toed shoes) is required. Spiked boots or tabis are recommended.

 

Plan for the day: In the parking area at 8:45 am, we will pass out gear and give a short introduction/safety briefing. Starting the hike around 9:00 am, we anticipate making it to the work area around 10:30 am. We will then go over the work/data collection plan and start removing (everyone will be using small folding handsaws; KMWP staff will also be using herbicide) paperbark (Melaleuca quinquenervia), manuka (Leptospermum scoparium), strawberry guava (Psidium cattleianum), and Passiflora laurifolia. We will break for lunch around 12:30 pm, work just a bit more after that, and then head back down, aiming to reach the parking area before 3:00 pm.

 

Please RSVP to Koolau Mountains Watershed Partnership <koolaupartnership@gmail.com>We will be limiting the number of people to 10 so the first ones to RSVP will have priority. Hope you can make it!

Waianae

Upcoming Volunteer Days!

Make a difference in your watershed by volunteering with the Wai’anae Mountains Watershed Partnership!

For more information and to sign up for any of the events below please
email:  mikaelambolling@gmail.com
Thursday, July 3rd, 2014
8:30am – 3pm
Wai’anae Kai Forest Reserve

WMWP is hosting a volunteer day at the Vegetative Fire Break in the Wai’anae Kai Forest Reserve. The day will consist of cutting down and hauling invasive haole koa trees with two Hawai’i Youth Conservation Corps teams. Volunteers can come for the whole day or just for a few hours!
Friday, July 25th, 2014
8:30am – 2:00pm
Ahua Reef – Joint Base Pearl Harbor Hickam

Come help pull out invasive pickleweed at WMWP’s only coastal project area. Anyone is welcome to come as long as they provide their information before-hand to get on base. This is a great volunteer trip for all ages! Come for a few hours or the whole day!
Sunday, July 27th, 2014
8:30am – 1:30pm
Wai’anae Kai Forest Reserve

Cut down invasive haole koa trees in WMWP’s Vegetative Fire Break with the American Water Works Association and the Hawai’i Water Environment Association.

Kohala

Help us control invasive HImalayan ginger in the Kohala cloud forest!
 

What is a cloud forest?The upland forests of Kohala Mountain are usually clothed in clouds. When the tiny droplets of water that make up the clouds collide with trees, the leaves become saturated with water, and the water drips to the ground. This “fog drip” is a significant source of water for our forests, especially during drought times like we have been experiencing lately.

You will know you are in a cloud forest when you notice that the trunks of trees are covered in dense layers of epiphytes — the plants that grow on other plants — like mosses, ferns, herbs, and even other trees!

These forests are globally rare and contain many endangered species of plants, insects, and snails.

Yes! I want to be a Ginger Ninja!

Ginger & Cloud Forest

Join us in our ninja battle against this invader!

Saturday, June 28, 2014   8:30 am – 3:30 pm

We are making a difference to the forest of Pu’u Pili, but it’s a steep uphill battle against the menace of non-native Himalayan ginger (Hedychium gardnerianum).

For the past century or so, Himalayan ginger has spread unhindered from a few exotic gardens, slowly but surely, into the native forest. It now dominates many thousands of acres of watershed forest, and like most invasive plants in Hawai’i, its spread is uncontrolled by pests, predation, or disease.

So what is KWP doing about it?  We have designated special areas on the mountain where our partners think it is possible to beat back the invasion and let the native forest dominate and thrive.  Pu’u Pili at Kahua Ranch is one of those places, and we’ve cleared nearly 30 acres so far.

On this volunteer day, you will be instructed in The Ninja Way, following the Three Deadly Steps: Slice, Stack, Spray. Please bring along rain gear (essential!), warm clothes, boots or sturdy shoes that can get muddy, long pants and long-sleeved shirt (needed for safety during our work). Pack your lunch and water bottle in a backpack, and get ready for a day in the inspiring wet wilderness of Kohala Mountain.

Meet at The Kohala Center office (65-1291A Kawaihae Rd) in Waimea at 8:30, and we will carpool in the KWP 4×4 vehicles. We will return to Waimea by 3:30. Because this trip has limited seats, please RSVP only if you are prepared to join us rain or shine!

 

KMWP, May 24

 

Koʻolau Mountains Watershed Partnership’s next volunteer work trip will be at Manana on Saturday, May 24. All who are comfortable with a 4-mile round-trip hike, plus work time, are welcome. The hike to the work site is moderate and takes about 1 to 1.5 hours.

Where and when to meet: We will be meeting at the end of Komo Mai Drive, in front of the locked gate restricting vehicular traffic, at 8:45 am on Saturday, May 24. When you turn onto Komo Mai Drive, drive through Pacific Palisades to the end of the road. There is street parking near the cul-de-sac.

What to bring: Pack plenty of water (~2 liters), lunch, snacks, sunscreen, hat, rain gear and sunglasses. We will provide all the necessary tools (handsaws and gloves). Proper foot wear (closed toed shoes) is required. Spiked boots or tabis are recommended.

Plan for the day: In the parking area at 8:45 am, we will pass out gear and give a short introduction/safety briefing. Starting the hike around 9:00 am, we anticipate making it to the work area around 10:30 am. We will then go over the work/data collection plan and start removing (everyone will be using small folding handsaws; KMWP staff will also be using herbicide) paperbark (Melaleuca quinquenervia), manuka (Leptospermum scoparium), strawberry guava (Psidium cattleianum), and Passiflora laurifolia. We will break for lunch around 12:30 pm, work just a bit more after that, and then head back down, aiming to reach the parking area before 3:00 pm.

Please RSVP. We will be limiting the number of people to 20 so the first ones to RSVP will have priority. Hope you can make it! Email Koolau Mountains Watershed Partnership, koolaupartnership@gmail.com to RSVP. 

Kohala – May 17

By the end of 2014, we will have a 3/4-mile nature trail at the Koai’a Tree Sanctuary, thanks to a Natural Resources Program grant from the Hawaii Tourism Authority through the Hawaii Community Foundation. A botanical illustrator and a graphic designer working on a trail map and brochure, and we will be putting signs along the trail as well.  Stay tuned!

Mālama Koaiʻa Day

Volunteer Work Day in the Koaiʻa Sanctuary

Saturday, May 17, 2014 8:30 am – 2:30pm

150 years ago, instead of unending grassy pastures, a mesic (moist) forest blanketed the middle-elevation leeward slopes of Kohala Mountain. This unique koaiʻa-mamane-naio-ʻiliahi forest once covered more than 40,000 acres, and was home to one of the most biologically diverse ecosystems in Hawaiʻi. What do we have left of this massive forest? A few scattered native trees, and a little 13-acre plot of forest. Yup, that is it. The direct result of the impacts of humans and their domestic animals.

Since about 1960, that 13 acres has been fenced and protected as the Koaiʻa Tree Sanctuary, under the care of the State DLNR Division of Forestry and Wildlife. Itʻs all that we have left, and we are doing our best to care for it, to mālama both the ancient trees and the new growth.

Join us this Saturday for a diverse day of work, suitable for any age and ability, including kids!  We will be building steps on the trail, clearing a new slope of fountain grass, and planting a couple hundred native shrubs. Wear sturdy shoes, and bring protection from both sun and rain. We will provide tools, gloves, and snacks. You bring lunch and a water bottle.

Interested in joining us? Click here to RSVP by Friday, 5/16/14.

Maui- Waikamoi Hike 5/17

waikamoi 5.17.2014

Waihee Ridge Stewardship on Saturday, May 10 and May 17

Aloha!
Come join the West Maui Mountains Watershed Partnership for a Volunteer Work Day on the Waihe’e Ridge Trail on Saturday May 10 or Saturday May 17 (or both!) from 9:00am – ~3:00pm.  We will be removing invasive Strawberry guava and talking story about the importance of a healthy watershed and threats to our native rainforests.  Strawberry guava is a water hog and one of the most invasive weeds in West Maui, so come help fight it!  We will hike about half way up the trail (~1-1.5 miles) for the control work which will involve cutting smaller trees and frilling larger ones.  We will provide all the necessary tools (handsaws and gloves) and will also be using herbicide.  WMMWP staff will mainly be the ones involved in the actual herbicide, although those that feel comfortable are welcome to take part.  Spots are limited, so please call (808) 661-6600 or email us at outreach@westmauiwatershed.org with your full name, phone number and the date you would like to reserve your spot.  We look forward to seeing you!  Mahalo!

IMAG4446

A group of volunteers works together to frill this large strawberry guava tree while another volunteer stands by, ready to apply herbicide to the cuts. Teamwork makes it possible to clear strawberry guava from Waihee Ridge.

When:  Saturday, May 10 and May 17
Time: 9:00am to about 3:00pm

Meeting place: Gravel parking lot just before Camp Maluhia @ Waihe’e Ridge Trail Head
Directions: From Waihe’e town follow Kahekili Hwy(340) west, turn up Maluhia Rd.(across from Mendes Ranch) and go 0.9 mi up. On the right hand side, just before camp Maluhia, there is a large gravel lot. Meet us there!

What to bring:
Water
Lunch
Comfortable, Sturdy closed-toed footwear
Long sleeved shirt
Rain jacket or poncho
Optional: sunglasses, sunscreen, hat, camera
Gloves if you have (we will have many extras)

Kohala Watershed Partnership

The native trees and shrubs planted by volunteers over the past 5 years in the Koai’a Corridor restoration area are busting through the grass and really becoming a forest!

Celebrating Earth Day 2014

Help us reach our goal of 1000 native trees planted in April!

Join us for two volunteer work days next week, when we will carrying on the KWP tradition of planting native trees to celebrate Earth Day. We are offering a half day of planting in the morning on the actual Earth Day, Tuesday, April 22nd, and a full day of planting on Saturday, April 26th. Join us for one or both days!

For either day, be sure to wear sturdy footwear, and bring along a water bottle and dress for any weather (rain gear, jacket, and sunscreen). We will provide tools, gloves, snacks, drinking water, and of course, PLANTS!

The ultimate question is. . . will you be in the picture this year?

Tuesday, April 22
8:30 am – 12:30 pm
Click to RSVP for 4/22
Are your Saturdays just too busy to fit in a volunteer day? Yes? Then join us for a morning of planting on Earth Day.
Saturday, April 26
8:30 am – 3:30 pm
Click to RSVP for 4/26
Join other members of the community and the KWP crew to plant trees at the Koai’a Corridor. Don’t forget your lunch!

Join Koolau Mountains Watershed Partnership On 4/19

EarthDay_SC_2014 (11x17).indd

Maui- Hike Waikamoi on 4/19

waikamoi